Southern Maine and New Hampshire Striped Bass Fishing Report

It's been a particularly chilly spring and our waters are hovering around 50 degrees by the mouth of the Piscataqua River depending on the tide. If you explore deeper into our estuaries you will find a little warmer water in great bay and the rivers that feed our backwaters.  The Piscataqua naturally divides NH and Maine creating diverse striped bass habitat on both sides of the river whether you are a living "The way life should be"(ME) or "Live Free or Die"(NH).  

Schoolie sized stripers are flooding our waters.  There are reports of TONS of small fish this year from all over the New England seaboard.  People are catching stripers from 8" up to the low 30" range along our home coast and estuaries.  Bigger fish are very close and approaching our waters with every tide cycle.  

Bait is filling our Maine and New Hampshire water and providing excellent early season nourishment for our hungry bass.  We've seen giant schools of sand eels, herring, silversides etc.  Our rivers are full of herring and bass are eager for the out migrating herring to leave the sanctuaries of their native spawning grounds.  

Birds are filling the skies.  The call of the Common Tern will now be a familiar sound for the summer ahead.  Herring gulls dive on the flats picking off crabs and other benthic species that reveal themselves.    

The merrimack river around Newburyport and Plum Island has warmed just enough to be fishing very well and larger bass can be found.  

Its time to start getting on the water because fish are here!  The fishing is going to just keep on getting better and better over the coming weeks.  Book your trip with Soul Fly Outfitters out of Kittery, Maine and get a taste of this awesome fishery for yourself.  

 Terns work the mouth of the Piscataqua River as thick school of bait congregate at the low tide.  

Terns work the mouth of the Piscataqua River as thick school of bait congregate at the low tide.  

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